The Illustrated Utopian Society in the Road and the Postman by David Brin and Cormac McCarthy,

Author:

Number of pages : 72-78

Abstract

Keywords

Abstract

For a long time, people were fascinated with imagination, how the world would be like, especially after occurring a catastrophe that leads to the earth-shattering event. The concept of doomsday has religious dimensions. Similarly, the apocalyptic concept poses a threat of catastrophes that might happen in the future. Generally, what people are curious about is whether human race can survive or not. The apocalyptic concept in fiction has a distinct remoteness including nuclear war, natural disasters, human overpopulation, and destruction of the environment, the wrath of God, alien invasion, or mysterious and unknown forces. Basically, the stories of apocalyptic genre contain a horrible event exposing the events in such a consternation way which is not for the advancement of the story, but it shows the depiction of people coping with the degradation of society. Some of the apocalyptic stories happen suddenly and cause a trauma. Both of the books that mentioned in this article share the same trait. In the road, an ambiguous apocalyptic event afflict is unknown to the reader. On the other hand, in the postman, there is a trait of trauma although, the apocalyptic event happens because of a devastating war still, no one can believe that great America has fallen down. The features of this genre are to expose what people do when all the social structures have previously known are gone. Thus, this paper focuses on the illustrated utopian society by both of the authors. There are several common themes between both of the books. But this study confirms to examine the utopian trait in the post-apocalyptic story and how the authors attempt to optimize the catastrophe in order to spread hope and optimism.

Keywords